Indigenous People Offer Us A Deeper, More Inclusive World

 “Think I might be a litte bit in love with Ruby Tui. Bringing te reo to the BBC. Best Olympic interview yet!” Black Fern Ruby Tui’s interview about their win in the women’s rugby sevens Olympic semi-final inspired this Facebook comment from a friend in England. The Black Ferns are predominantly Māori women and […]

https://www.sosj.org.au/indigenous-people-offer-us-a-deeper-more-inclusive-world/

What Did Julian Tenison Woods Say About Indigenous Australians?

When the ordained ministry of Julian Tenison Woods began in Penola in 1855 he soon saw the conditions under which the local Aboriginal people lived. What he observed raised concerns that remained with him for the rest of his life. Several times, on his various journeys, he wrote about the Aboriginal people he encountered.

https://www.sosj.org.au/what-did-jtw-say-about-indigenous-australians/

NAIDOC Week 2021: Spotlight on Ministry – Sr Michele Madigan

Michele Madigan is a Sister of Saint Joseph who has been involved with Aboriginal people in South Australia for about 40 years. She has ministered in Port Adelaide, in the bush, and most recently has worked in the Murraylands, East of Adelaide for nearly 20 years. Sr Michele is also involved with the SA Reconciliation […]

https://www.sosj.org.au/naidoc-21-ministry-michele-madigan/

NAIDOC Week 2021: The SOSJ Reconciliation Action Plan Journey

This year’s NAIDOC week theme, “Heal Country”, encourages us to take practical action to “properly work towards redressing historical injustice”. Over the last year the Sisters of Saint Joseph have taken a further step forward by developing a Reconciliation Action Plan, using Reconciliation Australia’s framework.

https://www.sosj.org.au/naidoc-21-sosj-journey-rap/

What Reconciliation Means To Me: Alma Cabassi rsj

Alma Cabassi is a Sister of Saint Joseph currently living in Halls Creek, Western Australia. Her ministry for the last nine years has been living alongside our First Peoples, listening, reflecting and being with them. Reconciliation isn’t a single moment or place in time. It’s lots of small steps, some big strides, and sometimes unfortunate […]

https://www.sosj.org.au/what-reconciliation-means-to-me-alma-cabassi-rsj/

What Reconciliation Means To Me: Lorrae Collins and Vivica Turnbull

Vivica Turnbull is a Barkindji/Ngamba woman from Bourke in her first year of a Bachelor of Biodiversity and Conservation at Macquarie University, Sydney. Lorrae Collins is the Congregational Finance Director for the Sisters of St Joseph of the Sacred Heart. Lorrae’s husband Paul and Vivica’s father Bruce met while Bruce was a student of St […]

https://www.sosj.org.au/what-reconciliation-means-to-me-lorrae-vivica/

What Reconciliation Means To Me: Sherry Balcombe

Sherry Balcombe has a background in Aboriginal welfare, with six years at the Victoria Aboriginal Child Care Agency in Victoria and seventeen years at the Aboriginal Catholic Ministry of the Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne, six years of which she has spent as its Co-ordinator. She is a Western Yalanji, Djabaguy/Okola woman from Far North Queensland […]

https://www.sosj.org.au/what-reconciliation-means-to-me-sherry-balcombe/