Julian Tenison Woods: A Life – Chapters 16th, 17th and 18th

Chapters 16th, 17th and 18th

Mary MacKillop, 1871

In addition to [Father Woods’] duties as Secretary to the Bishop, Director General of Catholic Education (a regular system of which he was expected to organise) and Inspector of Schools, he had to take charge of Port Adelaide, eight miles from the city, until another priest could be had. Dr Sheil was to go to Europe immediately after Easter, and the whole of the education arrangements were left to the new Director General…[i]

Dr Sheil left for Rome on 29th April and Father Woods worked on alone at his school plans. Nothing baffled him – troubles and difficulties he said were ‘a sign that God blesses our work, and please Him, we will prosper too.’…[ii]

He had drawn up School Regulations for the use of the diocese and was considering the advisability of bringing two of the four Sisters (who were teaching in the South East under his supervision) to Adelaide. Once established in the city, they (being already experienced teachers) could train others: so he determined to wait no longer…[iii]

Sister Mary and her companion arrived at Port Adelaide on Sunday 23rd June. Father Woods met them and accompanied them to the city by the evening train.  They took up their residence in the cottage provided for them by Miss McMullen who remained with them as a postulant. The Cathedral school was opened on the Feast of the Visitation, 2nd July, attended by sixty children…And now the work was fairly begun…[iv]

At the Examination six months after, there were 200 pupils present…[v]

Father Julian Tenison Woods

On the Feast of the Assumption (15th August), Sister Mary made her Profession and two postulants, one being Miss McMullen, received the Habit, the first ceremony of the kind that ever took place in Adelaide…[vi]

It might interest the reader to see the round of duties he attended to in the course of the year, as taken from the Southern Cross of 1867 and 1868. This paper came into existence a short time after Father Woods had taken up his residence in Adelaide… Father Woods contributed largely to it… his former connexion with the press being serviceable.

The first number appeared on 20th September, announcing itself as ‘[t]he only attempt ever made by the Catholics of South Australia to have a little journal of their own’…[vii]

This one year will suffice to show the devotedness with which the earnest worker carried out his design.[viii]

 


This extract is taken from:

Chapters 16th, 17th and 18th of Julian Tenison Woods: A Life has been used with the kind permission of the Trustees of the Sisters of Saint Joseph 1997 and the publishers, St Paul’s Publications.

If you would like to read the full text, including an informative Introduction, footnotes and an index, this book is available online and from some Mary MacKillop Centres.

For locations and contact details visit the Josephite Books webpage.


Carmel Jones rsj

 

Footnotes:
[i] Chapter 16th, p. 86
[ii] Chapter 16th, p. 86
[iii] Chapter 16th, p. 87
[iv] Chapter 16th, p. 92
[v] Chapter 16th, p. 92
[vi] Chapter 16th, p. 93
[vii] Chapter 17th, p. 94
Note: Chapters 17 and 18 refer to the events that made up a year in the life of Father Woods as compiled by Mary MacKillop from the Southern Cross journals of 1867 and 1868 – including opening new schools, attending Board meetings, giving lectures, celebrating Masses and Funerals, preaching sermons, establishing orphanages, refuges, temperance guilds and a Catholic Book Depot, writing textbooks for Geography and Grammar and arranging Examinations.  The number and variety of events and activities make very interesting reading.
[viii] Chapter 18th, p. 120

Laudato Si’ Webinar: Part Five

In May 2015 Pope Francis launched his encyclical with the subtitle “On Care for our Common Home” and the title “Laudato Si’” which are the opening words for a hymn composed by St Francis of Assisi in the 1200s.

For our time, this document is both relevant and important, since it highlights the priority that respect for the environment should have in Catholic life, and integrates the notion with what is central to our understanding of humanity’s relationship with God.

It is striking that many of the issues raised in Laudato Si’ find a parallel in the writings of Julian Tenison Woods. We can be proud of the fact that Julian Woods, as co-founder with Mary MacKillop, injected into the foundations of the Sisters of Saint Joseph a sense of the integration of spirituality and nature and set an example of science being a means of relationship with God. We remember, however, that he lived in a different time from us, and no-one is suggesting that his perceptions of creation and his world are the same as those of Pope Francis. But like a thread that runs through the whole garment, Julian’s words do illustrate his insights into a constant theme that can be traced from the Gospels to our era, and they, like those of Laudato Si’, can help us recognise these teachings as foundational to our faith.

In this five-part webinar, Sr Mary Cresp explores some of the parallels between the work of Pope Francis and Julian Tenison Woods. Sr Colleen Keeble assists her in the presentation.

You’re invited to watch the fifth and last part of the webinar below:

Conversion

 

View all the webinar videos here

So Small a Beginning: Part 5

Sr Marie Foale speaks about the beginnings of the Institute of St Joseph for the Catholic education of poor children.

She believes that as a young Josephite growing up, she had a sense that one day Mary MacKillop and Julian Tenison Woods had made a spontaneous decision to found an order.

You’re invited to watch the fifth and final part of Sr Marie’s conference speech, ‘So Small a Beginning’ below…

Part 5

Click here to view Part 1

Click here to view Part 2

Click here to view Part 3

Click here to view Part 4

Julian Tenison Woods: A Life – Chapters 15th & 16th

Chapters 15th and 16th

Mary MacKillop, 1871

Father Woods returned to Penola as he had arranged. Great was the sorrow of his parishioners on hearing that he was certainly leaving after Christmas…[1]

Preparations had to be made for the expected visit of the Bishop and for the Confirmation, which had been delayed several years, owing to the prolonged absence of the late Bishop.  Many adults were to be confirmed and Father Woods was kept busy at work, but as we have already seen, he considered it ‘a perfect luxury to have plenty to do.’…[2]

On the day of the Bishop’s arrival, a party of the principal parishioners rode, or drove, out about twenty miles to meet him…A picnic to the curious caves of Struan in the limestone country of the Mosquito Plains had been arranged so that the Bishop and his scientific companion [Father J N Hinteroecker] should have an opportunity of inspecting those wonderful specimens of geology…[3] [Father Hinteroecker] and Father Woods became great friends – indeed the two priests were in many ways kindred spirits…[4]

During the visit of the Bishop, the school question was much discussed. His Lordship addressed Miss MacKillop as Sister Mary to the surprise of her friends, and henceforth she was known by that title.

Father Julian Tenison Woods

The school, and indeed everything commenced by Father Woods, was all that could be desired by the Bishop.

At length, the long talked of parting came. On his last Sunday, Father Woods preached his farewell sermon amid the tears and sobs of his people…[5] It was a fearfully hot day and bush fires were prevalent. Penola is surrounded by forests and has had some extensive fires, being on more than one occasion in danger of total destruction.

Among his reminiscences, Father Woods told stories of the fires…[6] Father Woods had witnessed many a bush fire, and he had a grand one as a send-off. After leaving Penola, while ploughing through the dreary sand over the Victorian border, thick smoke enveloped the travellers but soon blazing trees added to their discomfort, crackling branches snapped off and fell in their way. …[7] Instead of going on to Portland, they stayed for the night at Dartmoor and continued their journey the next day…[8] The earnest naturalist, the scientist priest, the lover of the wild and the beautiful turned to a new and busier phase in his varied life.

Father Woods arrived in Melbourne on 16th February…[9] We hear of Father Woods preaching at St Francis’ on the evil of balls. There was a warship in the Bay and the Officers gave a ball. It was Lent – hence the sermon. He persuaded a noted family not to go, much to the annoyance of some young people.

Very few could resist his influence, yet he never seemed to try to induce others to adopt his opinions…[10] At the commencement of April he left for Adelaide…[11]

 


This extract is taken from:

Chapters 15th and 16th of Julian Tenison Woods: A Life has been used with the kind permission of the Trustees of the Sisters of Saint Joseph 1997 and the publishers, St Paul’s Publications.

If you would like to read the full text, including an informative Introduction, footnotes and an index, this book is available online and from some Mary MacKillop Centres.

For locations and contact details visit the Josephite Books webpage.


Carmel Jones rsj

 

Footnotes:
[1] Chapter 15th, p. 76
[2] Chapter 15th, p. 76
[3] Chapter 15th, p. 77
[4] Chapter 15th, p. 80
[5] Chapter 15th, p. 81
[6] Chapter 15th, p.81
[7] Chapter 15th, p.82
[8] Chapter 15th, p. 82
[9] Chapter 16th, p. 83
[10] Chapter 16th, p. 85
[11] Chapter 16th, p. 85

Laudato Si’ Webinar: Part Four

In May 2015 Pope Francis launched his encyclical with the subtitle “On Care for our Common Home” and the title “Laudato Si’” which are the opening words for a hymn composed by St Francis of Assisi in the 1200s.

For our time, this document is both relevant and important, since it highlights the priority that respect for the environment should have in Catholic life, and integrates the notion with what is central to our understanding of humanity’s relationship with God.

It is striking that many of the issues raised in Laudato Si’ find a parallel in the writings of Julian Tenison Woods. We can be proud of the fact that Julian Woods, as co-founder with Mary MacKillop, injected into the foundations of the Sisters of Saint Joseph a sense of the integration of spirituality and nature and set an example of science being a means of relationship with God. We remember, however, that he lived in a different time from us, and no-one is suggesting that his perceptions of creation and his world are the same as those of Pope Francis. But like a thread that runs through the whole garment, Julian’s words do illustrate his insights into a constant theme that can be traced from the Gospels to our era, and they, like those of Laudato Si’, can help us recognise these teachings as foundational to our faith.

In this five-part webinar, Sr Mary Cresp explores some of the parallels between the work of Pope Francis and Julian Tenison Woods. Sr Colleen Keeble assists her in the presentation.

You’re invited to watch the fourth part of the webinar below:

Consequences

 

View Parts 1 to 3 here

So Small a Beginning: Part 4

Sr Marie Foale speaks about the beginnings of the Institute of St Joseph for the Catholic education of poor children.

She believes that as a young Josephite growing up, she had a sense that one day Mary MacKillop and Julian Tenison Woods had made a spontaneous decision to found an order.

You’re invited to watch the fourth part of Sr Marie’s conference speech, ‘So Small a Beginning’ below…

Part 4

 

Click here to view Part 1

Click here to view Part 2

Click here to view Part 3

Julian Tenison Woods: A Life – Chapters 12th to 14th

Chapters 12th, 13th and 14th

Mary MacKillop, 1871

Among the residents of Portland who became intimate friends of Father Woods was the MacKillop family.  Mr MacKillop was the eldest brother of Mrs Alex Cameron of Penola Station, and Mrs MacKillop the sister of Mr D McDonald also of Penola…[1]

The Catholic School in Portland required a teacher and Miss MacKillop wrote to Father Woods on the subject.  In reply, 30th August, 1863 he said: ‘I think if you can take it for a time, so much the better. You might, until the school here is vacant…’[2]

Miss MacKillop took the Portland School and remained much longer than at first seemed probable.  Father Woods wrote to her very frequently….[3] Miss MacKillop was acquiring in the Portland school the experience and practical knowledge which fitted her for the work she was designed for…[4]

During this winter there was very great sickness in the district and the priests were kept busy attending to sick calls; yet Father Woods continued his scientific papers, receiving for them sufficient remuneration to enable him to purchase a stock of medicines for the poor. This was a great pleasure to him, though not to the doctor, who was often indignant at the loss of patients.

But it was those who could ill afford medical aid who became the special object of the priest’s solicitude; and there are yet living many who were cured by him when no other treatment was successful…[5]

Towards the end of the year … [6] Father Woods wrote to Miss MacKillop, asking could she come at once to commence the school so long talked of; or, if that were impossible, could her sister come to open the school for the present.

The sister did so and commenced school in St Joseph’s Church with twelve children.  The young teacher lived with her uncle and aunt until Miss MacKillop could come. This she did as soon as possible, intending to take a cottage and carry on the school therein; Father Woods agreeing with her that this school should be on purely Catholic principles.

However, it was impossible to rent a cottage for the purpose, therefore, a six-stalled stable was renovated by removing the stalls, flooring and lining the building, thus making a decent temporary school, a cottage being rented by Miss MacKillop for residence.

The new room was not ready until March – meanwhile the school was carried on in St Joseph’s Church…[7]

Father Julian Tenison Woods

The condition of the aboriginals attracted much attention…[8] There was great mortality among the blacks that year, and Father Woods was busy mixing medicines, and attending to their temporal wants …[9]

What might have been done had Father Woods remained longer we know not…[10] but his days in the South East were nearly over, his peaceful quiet life was to come to an end…[11]

The Right Rev. L. B. Sheil, O.S.F., Archdeacon of Ballarat …[12] was consecrated Bishop of Adelaide on the 15th August, 1866 in the Church of St Francis, Melbourne…[13]  This was an important event in the life of Father Woods… [14]

He wrote …[15] The Bishop has asked me to come into town as his secretary…[16] It is decided now that I leave Penola after Christmas…[17] Surely God will draw good out of it all…[18]

On 19th September, he wrote to Miss MacKillop:

You will see by the papers that the die is cast and all our arrangements are made …[19] I am appointed Director General of Catholic Education, Chairman of the Board and Inspector of Schools throughout the diocese.  I am also His Lordship’s Secretary…[20]  All my pain at leaving Penola, and all the bitter regret I should feel at leaving so many and such friends is more than compensated for by having the sole control of Catholic Education placed in my hands.


This extract is taken from:

Chapters 12th, 13th and 14th of Julian Tenison Woods: A Life has been used with the kind permission of the Trustees of the Sisters of Saint Joseph 1997 and the publishers, St Paul’s Publications.

If you would like to read the full text, including an informative Introduction, footnotes and an index, this book is available online and from some Mary MacKillop Centres.

For locations and contact details visit the Josephite Books webpage.


Carmel Jones rsj

 

Footnotes:
[1] Chapter 12th, p. 55
[2] Chapter 12th, p. 59
[3] Chapter 12th, p. 59
[4] Chapter 12th, p. 60
[5] Chapter 12th, p. 65
[6] Chapter 13th, p. 67
[7] Chapter 13th, p. 67
[8] Chapter 13th, p. 68
[9] Chapter 13th, p. 69
[10] Chapter 13th, p. 70
[11] Chapter 13th, p. 70
[12] Chapter 14th, p. 71
[13] Chapter 14th, p. 71
[14] Chapter 14th, p. 71
[15] Chapter 14th, p. 73
[16] Chapter 14th, p. 73
[17] Chapter 14th, p. 74
[18] Chapter 14th, p. 74
[19] Chapter 14th, p. 75
[20] Chapter 14th, p. 75

Laudato Si’ Webinar: Part Three

In May 2015 Pope Francis launched his encyclical with the subtitle “On Care for our Common Home” and the title “Laudato Si’” which are the opening words for a hymn composed by St Francis of Assisi in the 1200s.

For our time, this document is both relevant and important, since it highlights the priority that respect for the environment should have in Catholic life, and integrates the notion with what is central to our understanding of humanity’s relationship with God.

It is striking that many of the issues raised in Laudato Si’ find a parallel in the writings of Julian Tenison Woods. We can be proud of the fact that Julian Woods, as co-founder with Mary MacKillop, injected into the foundations of the Sisters of Saint Joseph a sense of the integration of spirituality and nature and set an example of science being a means of relationship with God. We remember, however, that he lived in a different time from us, and no-one is suggesting that his perceptions of creation and his world are the same as those of Pope Francis. But like a thread that runs through the whole garment, Julian’s words do illustrate his insights into a constant theme that can be traced from the Gospels to our era, and they, like those of Laudato Si’, can help us recognise these teachings as foundational to our faith.

In this five-part webinar, Sr Mary Cresp explores some of the parallels between the work of Pope Francis and Julian Tenison Woods. Sr Colleen Keeble assists her in the presentation.

You’re invited to watch the third part of the webinar below:

Connection

 

View Parts 1 and 2 here